RUSSIAN DATING SCAMS
Home ] Dating Scams Overview ] FAQs About Scams ] Search Our Site ] Reading List ] Our Blog ] Our Black List ] Other Black Lists ] Contact Us ]

[ Services ] Free Evaluation ] Letter Analysis ] Scam Prevention ] Verify Identity ] Verify Agency ] Verify Passport ] Background Checks ]

 


FILING A CRIMINAL COMPLAINT

This information is intended only for victims who actually sent money to the scammers.  

If you did not send any money to the scammer, you cannot file a complaint.

 

    

A raid on the scammers' office in Yoshkar-Ola, Russia

 

EVERYONE who lost money due to Russian dating scams should consider filing a criminal complaint with Russian or Ukrainian authorities. Although it may or may not return you YOUR money, but it is the only thing that has a potential to stop the scammers from doing the same thing to others just like you..

Unless Russian police receive an official legal complaint from someone who lost money due to a scam, police cannot investigate or prosecute this criminal activity, and the scammers will continue on with their business. 

 

 


THE PROCESS OF FILING A COMPLAINT

Filing a criminal complaint involves: 

  • writing a complaint

  • collecting all the supporting evidence of the scam

  • providing a copy of your ID

  • mailing the package of documents to the proper Russian authorities

When your complaint reaches Russian authorities, it will be looked at by a police officer. That officer will have to determine whether or not: 

  • the complaint can be used as a legal document 

  • there is evidence that a crime has been committed

  • there is enough supporting evidence that would justify starting a criminal case

If all the above things are present in the complaint, police will likely register the complaint and start a criminal investigation.

 


 

WHAT WILL HAPPEN AFTER THAT?

Having a case opened does not automatically means that the scammers will be led away in handcuffs right away (as some people would like to see). But it is the most important step toward that goal.

After the case is opened, police will try to locate the person whose name was used to receive the money. They will contact Western Union/MoneyGram or the bank, and try to obtain their records. Once that is done, they will contact the person who received the money (according to the records) and interview her or him, and the process will begin. 

Whether or not police will get lucky and find enough information to secure an arrest warrant is something that is sometimes beyond their control. Some cases unfold very quickly (if the crooks were not very good at covering their tracks). Some cases take months and years. But the main thing is, the scammers are usually aware of the ongoing investigation, and that causes them a great deal of worry. As long at the case against them is open, they will toss and turn at night, waiting for that terrible day when  their door will bust open and a few friendly SWAT team officers will ask them to lay on the floor face down.

 


 

IS IT WORTH THE TROUBLE?

Opening a criminal case against the scammers will result in several things:

  • scammers' operation will sooner or later be interrupted, either briefly or (hopefully) permanently. To avoid meeting with police, they may have to hide: stop showing up at school, stop living with their families, and stop living the high lifestyle that they have enjoyed so far

  • police will start untangle the evidence concerning their group activities, and it usually leads to discoveries of other, unreported crimes. The more participants of the group police locates, the more scammers become affected by your complaint. A single complaint can bring enormous amount of grief to 5, 10, 20 group participants who will curse the day their group ever crossed your path.

  • even if police cannot secure arrest warrants for your particular case, they will keep watching the group,  and as soon as someone else files a complaint against the same scammer group, guess what, the scammer's are in for the next round of troubles. Eventually, not matter how weak the case against them is, they may just decide that this business is not as rewarding as it used to be, and maybe look for another way to make money

 

But none of that will happen UNLESS SOMEONE ACTUALLY  FILES A COMPLAINT.

 


 

WILL THEY BE ACTUALLY SENT TO PRISON?

Several groups of scammers have been caught.

But realistically speaking, you have about 30-50% chance of hearing the good news about your scammer receiving a jail term. It doesn't sound like much, but it is still better than 0%.

There are several reasons for the small number of successful prosecutions:

  • It is a relatively new area of crime investigations for many police departments, and police officers are learning about these scams as they go

  • In some cases, there is just not enough evidence to go by

  • The scammer may decide to pay you back the money in order to get you to withdraw your complaint

  • The charges may not hold up in court if the judge is not too familiar with this type of crime

  • The scammers may receive probation, fines, or just public works assignment as their sentences


 

WHAT CAN BE DONE TO IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING THE SCAMMERS SENT TO PRISON?

  • make sure your complaint is well-written and your provide all the supporting evidence you can manage to get

  • find other victims of the same scammer, and convince them to file complaints

  • be patient with the process; many cases go unsolved simply because the victim stopped corresponding with the police  after a while, and the case withered away

 


 

HOW DO I FILE A COMPLAINT?

 

 

FAQs:

If I give you my lady’s information, can you check whether she is a scammer?

How can I check if a travel agency is real?

Do Russians/Ukrainians really have to pay a certain amount of money to be able to leave the country?

Can Russian police arrest the scammer when she comes to pick up the money at Western Union?

Do you want me to send you information about the scammer I am corresponding with?

How can I confirm that the photos I have been receiving actually belong to the person I am corresponding with?

 

 

 

What does a real Russian passport look like?